Curriculum Vitae

Francis J. Flynn

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Paul E. Holden Professor of Organizational Behavior

Stanford Graduate School of Business

Education

  • Ph.D. Organizational Behavior, University of California, Berkeley, December, 2000
  • M.S. Business, University of California, Berkeley, January, 1999
  • B.B.A. Finance and Computer Science, University of Notre Dame, May, 1994

Academic Positions

  • Resident Fellow, Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 2012-2013.
  • Paul E. Holden Professor of Organizational Behavior, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, 2011-present.
  • Hank McKinnell-Pfizer Inc. Director of the Center for Leadership Development and Research, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, 2010-present.
  • Professor of Organizational Behavior, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, 2010-present.
  • Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, 2006-2010
  • Class of 1967 Associate Professor of Business, Columbia Business School, Columbia University, 2006.
  • Associate Professor of Business, Columbia Business School, Columbia University, 2004-2006.
  • Assistant Professor of Business, Columbia Business School, Columbia University, 2000-2004.

Peer-Reviewed Publications

Jordan, J., Flynn, F., & Cohen, T. (in press). Forgive them for they have sinned: Links among guilt, identification, and forgiveness. European Journal of Social Psychology).

Newark, D. Flynn, F., & Bohns, V. (2014). Once bitten, twice shy: The effect of a past refusal on future compliance. Social Psychological and Personality Science.

Elsbach, K., & Flynn, F. (2013). Issues of identity in collaborations among creative professionals: A study of toy designers. Journal of Management Studies, 50, 515-544.

Wiltermuth, S., & Flynn, F. (2013). Beyond a shadow of a doubt: Power, moral clarity, and punishment in the workplace. Academy of Management Journal, 56: 1102-1023.

Torfason, M., Flynn, F., & Kupor, D. (2013). Here’s a tip: Countries that encourage gratuities are more corrupt. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 4: 348-354.

Bohns, V. & Flynn, F. (2013). Association by guilt: Toward a theory of individual behavior in organizations. Organization Science, 24: 1157-1173.

Schaumberg, R., & Flynn, F. (2012). Uneasy lies the head that wears the crown: The link between guilt-proneness and leadership. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 103: 327-342.

Adams, G., Flynn, F., & Norton, M. (2012). The gifts we keep on giving: Documenting and destigmatizing the regifting taboo. Psychological Science, 23: 1145-1150.

Willer, R., Flynn, F., & Ouzdin, S. (2012). Structure, identity, and solidarity: A comparative field study of direct and generalized exchange. Administrative Science Quarterly. 1-37.

Flynn, F. & Schaumberg, R. (2012). When feeling bad means feeling good: Guilt-proneness, work effort, and affective commitment. Journal of Applied Psychology, 97, 124-133.

Gino, F. & Flynn, F. (2011). Give them what they want: The benefits of explicitness in gift exchange. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. 47, 915-922.

Goncalo, J., Flynn, F., & Kim, S. (2010). Are two narcissists better than one? The link between narcissism, perceived creativity, and creative performance. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 36, 1484-1495.

Flynn, F., Reagans, R., & Guillory, L. (2010). Do you two know each other? Transitivity, homophily, and the need for (network) closure. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 99, 855-869.

Bohns, V. & Flynn, F. (2010). “Why didn’t you ask?” Overestimating the willingness to seek help and underestimating discomfort in help-seeking. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 46: 402-409.

Flynn, F.J., & Amanatullah, E. (2010). Psyched up or psyched out: The impact of coactor status on individual performance. Organization Science.

Bowles, H. & Flynn, F. (2010). Gender and persistence in negotiation: A dyadic perspective, Academy of Management Journal, 53(4), 769-787.

Flynn, F. & Wiltermuth, S. (2010). Who’s with me? False consensus, brokerage, and ethical decision making in organizations. Academy of Management Journal,53, 1074-1089.

Flynn, F. & Adams, G. (2009). Money can’t buy love: Asymmetric beliefs about the link between gift price and feelings of appreciation. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 45, 404-409.

Anderson, C.A., Spataro, S., & Flynn, F.J. (2008). Personality and organizational culture as determinants of influence. Journal of Applied Psychology, 93, 702-710.

Flynn, F.J., & Lake, V. (2008). “If you need help, just ask”: Underestimating compliance with direct requests for help. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95, 128-143.

Ames, D., & Flynn, F.J. (2007). What breaks a leader: The curvilinear relationship between assertiveness and leadership. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 92, 307-324.

Flynn, F., Reagans, R., Amanatullah, E., & Ames, D. (2006). Helping one’s way to the top: Self-monitors achieve status by helping others and knowing who helps whom. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 91, 1123-1137.

Benjamin, L., & Flynn, F. (2006). The relationship between leadership style and regulatory mode: Value from fit? Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 100, 216-230.

Flynn, F.J., & Ames, D. (2006). What’s good for the goose may not be good for the gander: The benefits of self-monitoring for men and women. Journal of Applied Psychology, 91, 272-283.

Flynn, F.J. (2005). Identity orientations and forms of social exchange in organizations. Academy of Management Review. 30, 737-750.

Flynn, F.J. (2005). Having an open mind: The impact of openness to experience on interracial attitudes and impression formation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 88(5): 816-826.

Chatman, J.A., & Flynn, F.J. (2005). Full-cycle organizational psychology research. Organization Science. 16(4): 434-447.

Flynn, F.J., & Staw, B.M. (2004). Lend me your wallets: The effect of charismatic leadership on external support for an organization. Strategic Management Journal, 25: 309-330.

Ames, D., Flynn, F.J., & Weber, E. (2004). It’s the thought that counts: On perceiving how favor-givers decide to help. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 30(4): 461-474.

Flynn, F.J., & Brockner, J. (2003). It’s different to give than to receive: Asymmetric reactions of givers and receivers to favor exchange. Journal of Applied Psychology, 88(6): 1-13.

Flynn, F.J. (2003). How much should I help and how often? The effects of generosity and frequency of favor exchange on social status and productivity. Academy of Management Journal. 46(5): 539-553.

Flynn, F.J. (2003). What have you done for me lately? Temporal changes in subjective favor evaluations. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. Vol 91(1), 38-50.

Flynn, F.J., Chatman, J.A., & Spataro, S.A. (2001). Getting to know you: The influence of personality on the impression formation and performance of demographically different people in organizations. Administrative Science Quarterly, 46: 414-442.

Chatman, J.A., & Flynn, F.J. (2001). The influence of demographic composition on the emergence and consequences of cooperative norms in work teams. Academy of Management Journal, 44(5): 956-974.

Flynn, F.J. (2000). No news is good news: The relationship between media attention and strike duration. Industrial Relations, 39(1): 139-160.

Non-Refereed Publications

Flynn, F., & Bohns, V. (Forthcoming). Underestimating One’s Influence: Expectations of Compliance in Help-Seeking. In Kenrick, D. T., Goldstein, N. J., & Braver, S. (Eds.) Full Cycle Social Influence. New York: Oxford University Press.

Flynn, F. (in press). Power as Charismatic Leadership: A Significant Opportunity (and a Modest Proposal) for Social Psychology Research. In The Social Psychology of Power (eds. A. Guinote and T. Vescio). pp. 284-309.

Flynn, F. (in press). Give and Take: Psychological Mindsets in Conflict. Social Psychology in Organizations (eds. R. van Dick, K. Murnighan, & D. De Cremer).

Schaumberg, R. & Flynn, F. (2009). Gratitude and indebtedness in social exchange. Advances in Group Processes.

Moore, D., & Flynn, F. (2008). The case for behavioral decision research in organizational behavior. Annals of the Academy of Management. 2, 399-431.

Flynn, F. (2006). Subjective evaluations of cooperation in organizations. Research in Organizational Behavior, Vol. 27. pp. 133-174.

Flynn, F., & Chatman, J.A., (2002). What’s the norm here? Social categorization as a basis for group norm development. In E. Mannix and M. Neale (Eds.) Research on Managing Groups and Teams Vol. 5., pg. 135-160.

Flynn, F.J., & Chatman, J.A. (2001). Innovation and social control: Oxymoron or opportunity? (pp. 263-287). In C. Cooper, C. Earley, J. Chatman, & W. Starbuck (Eds.) Handbook of Organizational Culture: John Wiley Press.

Conference Proceedings

Jordan, J., Flynn, F., & Cohen, T. (2011). People in glass houses: Links among guilt, identification, and forgiveness. (Academy of Management Best Paper Proceedings).

Goncalo, J., Flynn, F., & Kim, S. (2010). From a Mirage to an Oasis: Narcissism, Perceived Creativity and Creative Performance. (Academy of Management Best Paper Proceedings).

Benjamin, L., & Flynn, F. (2006). Leadership style and regulatory mode: Value from fit? (Academy of Management Best Paper Proceedings).

Ames, D., Flynn, F.J., & Weber, E. (2003). It’s the thought that counts: On perceiving how favor-givers decide to help. (Academy of Management Best Paper Proceedings – Winner of the Best Paper Award for OB Division).

Flynn, F.J. (2003). Social exchange and identity orientations in organizations (Academy of Management Best Paper Proceedings).

Papers Under Review

Schaumberg, R., & Flynn, F. Absence makes the heart grow guilty: Guilt-proneness as a moderator of the job satisfaction-absenteeism relationship (revision requested at Journal of Applied Psychology).

Katz, J., & Flynn, F. Tax break or subsidy? Asymmetry in policy makers’ and entrepreneurs’ preferences for incentives. (under review at Management Science).

Schaumberg, R., & Flynn, F. Competence without a cost: Distinguishing between horizontal and vertical agency in judgments of men and women’s leadership ability (revision requested at Academy of Management Journal).

Feinberg, M., & Flynn, F. Reappraising guilt may be a trigger to unethical behavior. (revision requested at Emotion).

Working Papers

Bohns, V. & Flynn, F. The ”Asking Tax”: Help-recipients Value Help that is Requested Less than Help that is Volunteered.” (working paper) University of Toronto.

Flynn, F. & Schaumberg, R. Guilt is good: The effect of guilt-proneness on individual performance. (working paper). Stanford University.

Willer, R. & Flynn, F. Is generosity contagious? The link between gratitude and generalized reciprocity. (working paper). University of California, Berkeley.

Willer, R., Feinberg, M., Simpson, B., & Flynn, F. Is generosity sincere or strategic? Altruism versus status seeking in prosocial behavior. (working paper). University of California, Berkeley.

Presentations

Flynn, F.J., & Schaumberg, R. “Guilt works: A look at the functional aspects of guilt in organizations.” Stern School of Business, New York University, May, 2011

Flynn, F.J., & Schaumberg, R. “Guilt works: A look at the functional aspects of guilt in organizations.” Anderson School of Management, UCLA, April, 2010

Flynn, F.J., & Schaumberg, R. “Guilt is Good: Toward a theory of individual behavior in organizations.” Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, May, 2009

Flynn, F.J., & Schaumberg, R. “Guilt is Good: Toward a theory of individual behavior in organizations. Sloan School of Management, MIT, April, 2009.

Flynn, F.J., & Bohns, V. “Just ask”: How people underestimate the likelihood of compliance in favor exchange. Social Psychology and Organizations Conference, Kellogg School of Management February, 2009.

Flynn, F.J., & Bohns, V. “Just ask”: How people underestimate the likelihood of compliance in favor exchange. ICOS, University of Michigan, January, 2009.

Flynn, F.J., & Bohns, V. “Just ask”: How people underestimate the likelihood of compliance in favor exchange. Washington University, November, 2008.

Flynn, F.J., & Bohns, V. “Just ask”: How people underestimate the likelihood of compliance in favor exchange. Yale University, May, 2008.

Flynn, F.J., & Bohns, V. “Just ask”: How people underestimate the likelihood of compliance in favor exchange. Rice University, February, 2008.

Flynn, F.J., & Bohns, V. “Just ask”: How people underestimate the likelihood of compliance in favor exchange. University of Florida, February, 2008.

Flynn, F.J., & Bohns, V. “Just ask”: How people underestimate the likelihood of compliance in favor exchange. OBIR Colloquium: Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley, December, 2007.

Flynn, F.J., & Bohns, V. “Just ask”: How people underestimate the likelihood of compliance in favor exchange. GSIA, Carnegie Mellon, November, 2007.

Flynn, F.J., & Amanatullah, E. Psyched up or psyched out: The impact of coactor status on individual performance. Paper presented at the MIT Junior Faculty Conference, May 2007.

Ames, D., & Flynn, F.J. What breaks a leader: The curvilinear relationship between assertiveness and leadership. Center for Public Leadership, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, April 2007.

Flynn, F.J., & Bohns, V. “Just ask”: How people underestimate the likelihood of compliance in favor exchange. Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth University, February 2007.

Flynn, F.J., & Bohns, V. “Just ask”: How people underestimate the likelihood of compliance in favor exchange. Social Psychology Department, Stanford University, January, 2007.

Flynn, F. Identity orientations and forms of social exchange. American Sociological Association, Group Processes Conference, Montreal, Canada, August, 2006.

Flynn, F., Reagans, R., Amanatullah, E., & Ames, D. Helping one’s way to the top: Self-monitors achieve status by helping others and knowing who helps whom. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 2006, Atlanta, GA.

Flynn, F.J. Thanks for nothing: Gender stereotypes and helping behavior in organizations. London Business School, February, 2006.

Flynn, F.J. Too tough, too soon: Familiarity and the backlash effect. Stanford University, November, 2005.

Flynn, F.J. Gender stereotypes and the evaluation of helping behavior. Junior Faculty Organizational Behavior Conference, University of Pennsylvania, November, 2005.

Flynn, F.J., & Amanatullah, E. Psyched up or psyched out: The impact of coactor status on individual performance. Paper presented in the POS Links Series, University of Michigan, October 2005.

Flynn, F.J.. Thanks for nothing: The influence of demographic differences on evaluations of help in organizations. Penn State University, October 2005.

Ames, D., & Flynn, F.J. What breaks a leader: The curvilinear relationship between assertiveness and leadership. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 2005, Honolulu, HI.

Flynn, F. Gender and helping behavior in organizations. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 2005, Honolulu. HI.

Flynn, F.J.. Thanks for nothing: The influence of demographic differences on evaluations of help in organizations. University of California, Berkeley, May, 2005.

Flynn, F.J., & Amanatullah, E. Psyched up or psyched out: The impact of coactor status on individual performance. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 2004, New Orleans, LA.

Amanatullah, E., & Flynn, F. Reconciling conflicting gender stereotypes in organizations: The role of self-monitoring. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 2004, New Orleans, LA.

Flynn, F.J. Subjective evaluations of help in organizations. Organization Science Winter Conference, February, 2004.

Flynn, F.J., & Amanatullah, E. Psyched up or psyched out: The impact of coactor status on individual performance. Management Division Colloquium Series, Gouizeta Business School, Emory University, February, 2004.

Chatman, J.A., Flynn, F.J., & O’Reilly, C.A. Full-cycle organizational psychology research. Presented at the NSF-Organization Science Conference. Laguna Beach, CA. November, 2003.

Flynn, F.J., & Amanatullah, E. Psyched up or psyched out: The impact of coactor status on individual performance. Paper presented to the Psychology Department, Columbia University. November, 2003.

Flynn, F.J. 2003. Social exchange and identity orientation in organizations. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 2003, Seattle, WA.

Ames, D., Flynn, F.J., & Weber, E. 2003. It’s the thought that counts: On perceiving how favor-givers decide to help. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 2003, Seattle, WA.

Flynn, F.J. The relative impact of perceived imbalance and frequency on favor exchange among employees: Tradeoffs between social status and productivity. Paper presented at the Organizational Behavior Colloquium Series, Kellogg Graduate School of Business, Northwestern University, October, 2002.

Flynn, F.J. Toward a theory of favor exchange. Paper presented at the Management Division Colloquium Series, Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley, October, 2002.

Flynn, F.J., & Brockner, J. It’s not what you do, but how you do it: Givers’ and receivers’ differing reactions to episodes of favor exchange. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 2002, Denver, CO.

Flynn, F.J. Building effective networks (part of an all-academy symposium). Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 2002, Denver, CO.

Flynn, F.J. Cross-cultural studies of favor exchange in organizations. Paper presented to the Psychology Department, Peking University, Beijing, China, June, 2002.

Flynn, F.J. What have you done for me lately? Temporal changes in subjective favor evaluations. Paper presented at the Managerial and Organizational Behavior Colloquium Series, Graduate School of Business, University of Chicago, October, 2001.

Flynn, F.J. What does one good deed deserve? Asymmetrical favor evaluations as a source of social influence in organizations. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 2001, Washington, D.C.

Flynn, F.J. The impact of generosity and frequency of exchange on commitment, performance, and status. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 2001, Washington, D.C.

Flynn, F., & Chatman, J.A. What’s the norm here? Social categorizations as the basis for group norm formation. Paper presented at the Research on Managing Groups and Teams Conference, May, 2001, Cornell University.

Flynn, F.J. Alternative perspectives on understanding reciprocity in favor exchange. Paper presented at Teacher’s College, Columbia University, December, 2000.

Flynn, F.J. Toward a theory of favor exchange in organizations. Paper presented at the Organizational Behavior and Industrial Relations Colloquium at the Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley, December, 1999.

Flynn, F.J. Understanding reciprocity: A study of favor exchange in organizations. Paper presented at the INFORMS Dissertation Proposal Competition, November, 1999.

Flynn, F.J. & Chatman, J.A. Broadening the boundaries of organizational culture research: Analyses of context and consequences. Presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 1999, Chicago, IL, (Symposium Chair and Paper Presenter).

Flynn, F.J. & Chatman, J.A. Strong cultures and innovation: Oxymoron or opportunity? Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 1999, Chicago, IL.

Flynn, F.J., Chatman, J.A., & Spataro, S.A. Getting to know you: The influence of personality on the alignment of self-other evaluations of demographically different people. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 1999, Chicago, IL.

Flynn, F.J. & Sutton, R.I. Cooling out dissatisfied clients: Evidence from professional service firms. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 1998, San Diego, CA.

Chatman, J.A. & Flynn, F.J. The influence of demographic composition on the emergence and consequences of collectivistic norms in work teams. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, August, 1998, San Diego, CA.

Courses Taught

Organizational Behavior (core MBA class) – average instructor rating = 4.8/5.0

Crafting Effective Communication (MBA elective) – average instructor rating = 4.8/5.0

Executive Leadership (EMBA elective) – average instructor rating = 4.8/5.0

Organizational Behavior (core Ph.D. class) – average instructor rating = 4.9/5.0

Research Methods (core Ph.D. class) – average instructor rating = 4.8/5.0

Activities & Professional Affiliations

Associate Editor, Administrative Science Quarterly, 2008-2012

Associate Editor, Management Science, 2006-2007

Editorial Board, Administrative Science Quarterly, 2005-

Editorial Board, Academy of Management Journal, 2005-2007

Reviewer, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

Reviewer, Journal of Applied Psychology

Reviewer, Psychological Science

Reviewer, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

Reviewer, Academy of Management Review

Reviewer, Organization Science

Reviewer, Strategic Management Journal

Reviewer, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes

Member, Academy of Management

Member, American Psychological Association

Member, Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Member, Phi Beta Kappa